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Research & Impact

BCRF Research

The Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF), founded by the late Evelyn H. Lauder, is The Estée Lauder Companies’ leading partner in The Campaign. It is the highest rated non-profit breast cancer organization in the U.S., dedicated to advancing the world’s most promising research to eradicate breast cancer. Donate now.

How Does a Donation Support BCRF

  • $25Funds a 1/2 Hour of Research

Research in Action

Funds raised by The Campaign have supported research grants in the following areas:

IMPROVING TREATMENT

  • Development of new strategies to improve response to immunotherapies
  • Development of novel combination approaches for treatment of aggressive breast cancers
  • Identification of biomarkers and targeted therapies to personalize cancer therapies to each individual patient

ADVANCING DISPARITIES

  • Advancing the understanding of breast cancer disparities to improve delivery of care in Rwanda
  • Building infrastructure to conduct clinical trials to improve breast cancer treatment in West Africa
  • Identifying barriers to timely treatment for under-represented and other vulnerable populations to improve access to quality care

METASTATIC BREAST CANCER

  • Development and use of blood- and tissue- based biomarkers to identify breast cancers with a high risk of recurrence
  • Seeking approaches to prevent resistance to targeted therapies in advanced breast cancer
  • Identify strategies to improve treatments for patients with metastatic breast cancer

TUMOR BIOLOGY

  • Studying tumor processes to identify genes and pathways as potential targets in rare or aggressive breast cancers
  • Studying the interaction between tumor cells and non-tumor cells in the microenvironment to identify novel strategies for prevention or treatment

LIFESTYLE AND PREVENTION

  • Improving ways to assess risk in young girls with a family history
  • Designing personalized weight loss intervention to reduce the risk of breast cancer and breast cancer recurrence
  • Studying the impact of lifestyle during puberty on the future risk of breast cancer

SURVIVORSHIP/QUALITY OF LIFE

  • Developing tools to improve communication between doctors and their patients regarding genetic testing
  • Advancing the understanding of the long-term effects of breast cancer diagnosis and therapy to improve quality of life for patients living with breast cancer
  • Understanding the impact of stress associated with breast cancer diagnosis on patient outcomes and quality of life

Furthering Commitments to Help Eliminate Breast Cancer Disparities

To reinforce and build upon The Estée Lauder Companies’ legacy of breast cancer funding and furthering the company’s commitment to Racial Equity, the company and the Lauder Family will invest $1 million over two years towards research to help eliminate breast cancer disparities. Through grants with the Breast Cancer Research Foundation® (BCRF), two important new initiatives will be supported.

The first grant will support Dr. Nikhil Wagle of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and will aim to both improve our understanding of metastatic breast cancer in Black patients and expand the participation of Black breast cancer patients in clinical research. By studying the progression of disease and response to therapies specifically in Black patients, Dr. Wagle’s work is expected to help lead to targeted therapies, precision medicine and improved outcomes specifically for Black patients.

Through work in partnership with the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Association of Cancer Research, the second grant will support a new directive to provide funding to early-career, under-represented investigators in the breast cancer research field, or research aimed at breast cancer disparities. This work is expected to have a significant impact on the career development for early-stage investigators at a critical juncture in their career path. These grants are in addition to the BCRF-funded research outlined below.

Global Impact

Our global community supports research, education and medical services through 60+ organizations worldwide in so many ways including:

 

Collage of images of the Breast Cancer Campaign

Australia

For more than two decades, ELC Australia has supported the breast cancer community through their partnership with Look Good Feel Better and National Breast Cancer Foundation (NBCF) by helping to fund critical research. ELC Australia also works with the Garvan Institute of Medical Research (Breast Cancer Division) as well as the Breast Cancer Network Australia (BCNA).

Austria

Since 2002 ELC Austria has partnered with the Austrian Cancer Society. This organization supports women with breast cancer diagnosis who are in need of financial support during their treatment process.

Benelux

In 2020, ELC Benelux began a new partnership with Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Foundation, helping to fund a special project for breast cancer patients during pregnancy and while nursing. In addition, the ELC Benelux continues to align its Breast Cancer Campaign program with NGO partners Leuven Cancer Institute (LKI) and Pink Ribbon Foundation Belgium.

Brazil

Through the partnership with Américas Amigas, ELC Brazil has been able to help mobilize the resources of the organization and provide preventative breast cancer exams and medical assistance to women in Brazil with limited access to health care.

Chile

In Chile, ELC’s ongoing alliance with Fundación Oncológica at the Instituto Nacional del Cáncer started in 2008 and in 2019 ELC Chile launched a new initiative with Corporación Nacional del Cáncer (CONAC). Both organizations focus on providing education and affordable services of palliative care and treatment to women not covered by the public health care system.

China

In 2020, ELC China began a new partnership with the Minhang District branch of the Shanghai Charity Foundation, which cares for breast cancer patients in two rural counties: Shidian County, Yunnan and Xunwu County, Jiangxi.

Colombia

ELC Colombia works with Fundación Salud Querida an organization that educates the public on breast cancer and supports patients from diagnosis through remission, as well as raises funds to support those in need of treatment as well as organizes workshops with patients.

France

Created in France in 1994 by Estée Lauder Companies France and Marie Claire magazine, the association Ruban Rose has a dual mission to raise public awareness about breast cancer with an annual campaign and to raise funds to support research.

Greece

For the third year, ELC Greece funded a mobile mammogram unit through the Hellenic Cancer Society, which focuses on prevention and early detection. Through ELC Greece’s contributions, the Mobile Mammogram Unit is able to provide 2,000 free mammograms to local women who have limited access to healthcare.

Indonesia

ELC Indonesia has a long-standing association with Love Pink Indonesia where ELC helps to spread awareness on early signs of breast cancer and raises funds to help the organization purchase critical medical equipment necessary for early detection as well as provide mammograms for those in low-income communities.

Italy

Since 2015 ELC Italy has partnered with AIRC - The Italian Foundation for Cancer Research to support three-year fellowship projects named after The Estée Lauder Companies Italia.

Korea

In 2020, ELC honored the 20th year of the Breast Cancer Campaign in Korea and has maintained its long-standing partnership with Korean Cancer Society (KCS) to support initiatives surrounding public education, outreach and medical services for the low-income breast cancer community in the region.

Malaysia

ELC Malaysia has actively worked with four local organizations including National Cancer Society Malaysia (NCSM), Breast Cancer Welfare Association, Malaysia (BCWA), College of Radiology, Malaysia (CoR), and Cancer Research Malaysia (CRM). ELC Malaysia’s partners work to advance research, on ways to combat breast cancer stigma, promote early detection and support women in rural areas.

Mexico

Since 2013 ELC Mexico has partnered with three organizations, Fundación de Cáncer de Mama (FUCAM) and Cruz Rosa, both of which focus on providing support to Mexican women in low-income areas with limited resources required for treatment.

Middle East

In the Middle East, ELC continues to unite with Brest Friends in partnership with the Al Jalila Foundation providing resources, education, support groups and medical services to women with breast cancer diagnosis. This work includes offering emotional and financial advocacy for breast cancer patients and their families who face barriers to health insurance, transportation, and language.

Peru

ELC Peru has its ongoing collaboration with National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases (INEN), where funds raised helped provide thousands of mammograms for women in communities with limited access to healthcare. For the second year, ELC Peru worked with ALINEN, an organization that mobilizes women who are passionate about volunteering, to support the local breast cancer community.

Poland

Through the partnership with the International Hereditary Cancer Center at Pomeranian Medical University, ELC Poland helps to drive the advancements of hereditary cancer research, with a focus on gene mutation, by donating funds to the organization.

South Africa

ELC South Africa continues to work with Look Good Feel Better South Africa. They also provide support to the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Oncology Clinic, helping to upgrade facilities in the Oncology Wards. In addition, ELC South Africa raises funds to donate wish-list items of medical equipment, hygiene and nutritional supplies to Hospice South Africa.

Switzerland

In 2005 ELC Switzerland began their partnership with Look Good Feel Better and recently started a new initiative with the International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) whose mission is to advance clinical research, giving patients longer symptom-free periods after treatments, improving on patient quality of life.

United Kingdom & Ireland

ELC UK & Ireland have continued their strategic partnership with Future Dreams, and through this partnership is supporting the Future Dreams House which will be London’s first ever specialist breast cancer support center – offering free personalized services, addressing the emotional and physical side-effects of treatment. In the UK & Ireland, ELC has also partnered with Breast Cancer Now to create self-check education materials. In addition, they have a well-established program to help raise funds for BCRF to support life-saving breast cancer research.

2020-2021 BCRF Researchers

The Estée Lauder Companies› Breast Cancer Campaign is proud to support the following 2020-2021 Breast Cancer Research Foundation® Investigators in their efforts to prevent and cure breast cancer.

Improving Treatment

Fabrice Andre

Fabrice André, MD, PhD

Professor of Medical Oncology,
Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France

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Fabrice André, MD, PhD

Professor of Medical Oncology,
Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France

No two breast cancers are alike, and treatments don’t work the same for every patient. For patients whose tumors have a specific alteration in a gene or growth pathway, therapies that specifically target those vulnerabilities can more effectively kill the tumor. Unfortunately, many targeted therapies have yielded inconsistent results in clinical trials. FABRICE ANDRÉ, MD, PhD, Professor of Medical Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France, is conducting a clinical trial to identify genetic markers in the tumor and blood from patients that may predict response to a class of targeted therapies called PI3K inhibitors.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brands Awards in Memory of Evelyn H. Lauder

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Samuel Aparicio

Samuel Aparicio, BM, BCh, PhD, FRCPath FRSC

Professor
Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine University of British Columbia Vancouver, Canada

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Samuel Aparicio, BM, BCh, PhD, FRCPath FRSC

Professor
Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine University of British Columbia Vancouver, Canada

Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is not one disease, but a group of diseases that we are only beginning to understand. Research by SAMUEL APARICIO, BM, BCh, PhD, FRCPath FRSC, Professor, Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada showed distinct patterns in the structure of chromosomes in many triple negative breast cancers. He hopes to show that these patterns of chromosomal rearrangement predict responses to DNA-damaging chemotherapy and to further test this in a future clinical trial.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Canada Award

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Jill Bargonetti

Jill Bargonetti, PhD

Chair, Molecular, Cellular and Development PhD Subprogram in Biology
City University of New York Graduate Center

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Jill Bargonetti, PhD

Chair, Molecular, Cellular and Development PhD Subprogram in Biology
City University of New York Graduate Center

JILL BARGONETTI, PhD chairs the Molecular, Cellular and Development PhD Subprogram in Biology at the City University of New York Graduate Center. Her team focuses on two of the most critical drivers of breast cancer, MDM2 and p53. In the last year, Dr. Bargonetti's team linked p53 mutation to PARP inhibitor treatment in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). She is looking for ways to identify PARP-sensitive TNBC cells in tissue and blood to more accurately target them for more personalized therapy for all breast cancer types. This work can have significant impact in expanding the use of PARP inhibitors to more TNBC patients.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brands Awards in Memory of Evelyn H. Lauder

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Lewis Cantley

Lewis C. Cantley, PhD

Director, Sandra and Edward Meyer
Cancer Center, Weill Cornell
Medical College

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Lewis C. Cantley, PhD

Director, Sandra and Edward Meyer
Cancer Center, Weill Cornell
Medical College

The concept behind “targeted” cancer therapy is to target the source driving tumor growth with the idea that shutting down its addiction will cause the tumor to die. Unfortunately, the success of many “targeted” therapies is hampered by the tumor cells’ ability to activate other means of growth, rendering the therapy ineffective. LEWIS C. CANTLEY, PhD, the Director of the Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center at Weill Cornell Medical College is conducting studies to improve the effectiveness of one type of targeted therapy called PI3K inhibitors. His group is testing a novel combination approach to prevent resistance to these drugs.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Employee Fundraising Awards.

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Angelo Di Leo

Angelo Di Leo, MD, PhD

Head of Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Unit at the Department of Oncology Hospital of Prato in Italy

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Angelo Di Leo, MD, PhD

Head of Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Unit at the Department of Oncology Hospital of Prato in Italy

DR. DI LEO is the Head of Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Unit at the Department of Oncology Hospital of Prato in Italy. Dr. Di Leo and colleagues are studying breast cancers that express high levels of estrogen receptors (ER) and HER2 protein, referred to as ER-positive and HER2-positive, respectively. These breast cancers are treated with targeted therapies usually in combination with chemotherapy. This year, Dr. Di Leo’s team is working to identify which patients could safely avoid chemotherapy, and instead receive a CDK4/6 inhibitor with their targeted therapy. CDK4/6 inhibitors are a new class of targeted drugs that have been FDA-approved for patients with advanced ER-positive breast cancer.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estee Lauder Companies’ Award in Honor of Fabrizio Freda.

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Elizabeth Jaffee

Elizabeth Jaffee, MD

Professor of Oncology
Johns Hopkins University

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Elizabeth Jaffee, MD

Professor of Oncology
Johns Hopkins University

Advancements in immunotherapy have made it a promising treatment approach for some cancers, but as with most other cancer therapies, tumors can outsmart immune-based drug and block their effects. ELIZABETH JAFFEE, MD and LEISHA EMENS, MD, PhD, Professors of Oncology at Johns Hopkins University, will test the combination of trastuzumab (Herceptin®) and an immune targeted drug to enhance the immune response in HER2+ breast cancer. They hope to develop a highly active immunotherapy regimen that will translate into a clinical trial testing of the most potent combination immunotherapy regimen in patients with recurrent HER2+ breast cancer.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Clinique Awards

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Leisha Emens

Leisha Emens, MD, PhD

Professor of Medicine
University of Pittsburgh

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Leisha Emens, MD, PhD

Professor of Medicine
University of Pittsburgh

Advancements in immunotherapy have made it a promising treatment approach for some cancers, but as with most other cancer therapies, tumors can outsmart immune-based drug and block their effects. ELIZABETH JAFFEE, MD and LEISHA EMENS, MD, PhD, will test the combination of trastuzumab (Herceptin®) and an immune targeted drug to enhance the immune response in HER2+ breast cancer. They hope to develop a highly active immunotherapy regimen that will translate into a clinical trial testing of the most potent combination immunotherapy regimen in patients with recurrent HER2+ breast cancer.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Clinique Awards

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Xiaole Liu

Xiaole Liu, PhD

Director, Center for Functional
Cancer Epigenetics at Dana-Farber
Cancer Institute

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Xiaole Liu, PhD

Director, Center for Functional
Cancer Epigenetics at Dana-Farber
Cancer Institute

Robust biomarkers that can predict response to immunotherapy response are lacking. XIAOLE LIU, PhD, Co-Director, Center for Functional Cancer Epigenetics at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and her team have developed a computational model of tumor immune evasion, called "TIDE" (Tumor Immune Dysfunction and Exclusion), which can predict how well a tumor will respond to immunotherapy. Her goal is to both identify patients most likely to benefit from these therapies, as well as pursue combination approaches to improve response to immunotherapy in patients with triple negative breast cancer.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Employee Fundraising Awards

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Alan D. Andrea

Alan D’Andrea, MD

Professor of Radiation Oncology
Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA

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Alan D’Andrea, MD

Professor of Radiation Oncology
Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA

Most breast cancers caused by mutations in the BRCA1 gene are of the triple negative subtype – called TNBC. The PARP inhibitor, olaparib (Lynparza®), recently approved for treatment of advanced BRCA-related breast cancers, is the first targeted therapy for these patients. Not all patients, however, benefit from PARP inhibitor therapy. ALAN D’ANDREA MD, Professor of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston MA, is conducting laboratory studies to test combination approaches to improve response to PARP inhibitors so that more patients with TNBC will benefit.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Clinique Awards

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David Rimm

David Rimm, MD, PhD

Professor of the Department of Pathology and Director of the Pathology Tissue Services and Translational Science in Pathology
Yale University School of Medicine

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David Rimm, MD, PhD

Professor of the Department of Pathology and Director of the Pathology Tissue Services and Translational Science in Pathology
Yale University School of Medicine

There are currently five FDA-approved targeted therapies for patients with HER2+ breast cancer, but no way to tell which drug is right for an individual patient. DAVID RIMM, MD, PhD, Professor of the Department of Pathology and Director of the Pathology Tissue Services and Translational Science in Pathology at Yale University School of Medicine, is using patient samples collected as part of a large clinical trial to identify markers that predict response to various treatments and combinations. The goal is to develop an assay that can match the right drug to the right patient.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ North America Manufacturing & Distribution and Global Research & Development Awards

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Naoto Ueno

Naoto Ueno, MD, PhD

Professor of Medicine
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

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Naoto Ueno, MD, PhD

Professor of Medicine
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most lethal and aggressive form of breast cancer and has a high rate of metastasis. Although the disease affects only 2-4 percent of breast cancer patients, it is responsible for about 10 percent of breast cancer deaths in the U.S. NAOTO UENO, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, is studying ways to improve treatment for this disease with novel combination approaches.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Award

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Tumor Biology

Shelton Earp

H. Shelton Earp, MD

Director, Cancer Care at the Lineberger
Comprehensive Cancer Center
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

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H. Shelton Earp, MD

Director, Cancer Care at the Lineberger
Comprehensive Cancer Center
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

In order for tumors to grow and spread, tumor cells have to reprogram normal processes to support their abnormal growth and evade detection by the body’s immune system. They do this by changing the activity of genes that regulate growth processes. H. SHELTON EARP, MD, Director of Cancer Care at the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, is conducting studies to identify genes and proteins that have become dysregulated to identify new targets for drug development. Current studies are focused on strategies to improve response to immunotherapies in advanced breast cancers.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Awards

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Reis Filho Jorge

Jorge Reis-Filho, MD, PhD

Director, Experimental Pathology
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

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Jorge Reis-Filho, MD, PhD

Director, Experimental Pathology
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Breast cancer is not a single disease, but a group of diseases. There are five well-characterized types of breast cancer, where we understand the genetic drivers of the disease. However, there are many rare forms of the disease, which we currently know very little about. JORGE REIS-FILHO, MD, PhD, FRCPath, Director of Experimental Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, is leading studies to understand the genetic drivers of these rare breast cancers so that more accurate diagnoses can be made, and targeted therapies can be developed.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ North America Manufacturing & Distribution and Global Research & Development Awards

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Michael Wigler

Michael Wigler, PhD

Professor, Cancer Genetics
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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Michael Wigler, PhD

Professor, Cancer Genetics
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Tumors develop within normal tissue, and tumor cells interact with other non-cancer cells and host factors that are unique to each patient. This microenvironment influences the growth of the tumor as well as its response to anti-cancer therapies. MICHAEL WIGLER, PhD, Professor of Cancer Genetics at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, is conducting studies to identify the types and functional states of cells in “neighborhoods” around the tumor. He aims to understand the complex interactions between normal cells and the cancer cells to identify ways to achieve the best outcome for the patient.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Play for P.I.N.K. Award/ The Estée Lauder Companies’ Breast Cancer Campaign Award

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Jenny Chang

Jenny C. Chang, MD

Professor of Medicine, Weill Cornell
Medical College and Director, Cancer
Center, The Methodist Hospital,
Houston Methodist Research Institute

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Jenny C. Chang, MD

Professor of Medicine, Weill Cornell
Medical College and Director, Cancer
Center, The Methodist Hospital,
Houston Methodist Research Institute

New immune-based therapies called checkpoint inhibitors have improved outcomes in several challenging cancers including some Triple Negative Breast Cancers (TNBC). However, most TNBC tumors do not respond to this therapy. JENNY C. CHANG, MD, Professor of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College and Director of the Cancer Center at The Methodist Hospital, Houston Methodist Research Institute in Houston, TX, has identified a potential target that may enhance response to these therapies. In her current studies, Dr. Chang will test new combination therapies to enhance response to immunotherapy in TNBC.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Awards

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Mitch Dowsett, PhD, BSc

Professor, Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research in London

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Mitch Dowsett, PhD, BSc

Professor, Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research in London

Breast cancers that require estrogen to grow–called estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers– are the most frequently diagnosed type of breast cancer. These cancers respond well to endocrine therapies that block growth-promoting effects of estrogen. Yet resistance to endocrine therapy remains a significant clinical challenge and is often the cause of cancer recurrence and breast cancer deaths. MITCH DOWSETT, PhD, BSc, and IAN E. SMITH, MD, FRCP, FRCPE, Professors at The Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research in London, are studying the underlying causes of endocrine resistance so that preventive strategies can be developed.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brand Award in Honor of Elizabeth Hurley

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Ian E. Smith, MD, FRCP, FRCPE

Professor, Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research in London

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Ian E. Smith, MD, FRCP, FRCPE

Professor, Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research in London

Breast cancers that require estrogen to grow–called estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers– are the most frequently diagnosed type of breast cancer. These cancers respond well to endocrine therapies that block growth-promoting effects of estrogen. Yet resistance to endocrine therapy remains a significant clinical challenge and is often the cause of cancer recurrence and breast cancer deaths. MITCH DOWSETT, PhD, BSc, and IAN E. SMITH, MD, FRCP, FRCPE, Professors at The Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research in London, are studying the underlying causes of endocrine resistance so that preventive strategies can be developed.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brand Award in Honor of Elizabeth Hurley

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Adrian L. Harris, MD, DPhil

Professor of Medical Oncology, University of Oxford
Director, Cancer Research UK Medical Oncology Unit

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Adrian L. Harris, MD, DPhil

Professor of Medical Oncology, University of Oxford
Director, Cancer Research UK Medical Oncology Unit

Patients with a type of DNA repair defect may respond better to immunotherapy when it’s combined with a type of drug that stops the repair of cancer cells, which leads to cell death and a reduction in tumor growth.

ADRIAN L. HARRIS, MD, DPhil, Professor of Medical Oncology, University of Oxford and Director, Cancer Research UK Medical Oncology Unit, is conducting research to identify strategies to prevent tumor growth. He plans to use a new technology that will help identify pathways that regulate blood vessels in breast cancer, which could inform the development of new targeted treatments for the disease. To continue growing, breast cancer tumors must develop their own blood supply, and they do so by forming new blood vessels from ones that already exist. Dr. Harris is studying ways to prevent this process from occurring, which would starve tumors of the oxygen and nutrients they require. His work may reveal new strategies for preventing the growth of aggressive breast cancers.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies' UK & Ireland Award

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Gabriel N. Hortobagyi, MD, FACP, FASCO

Professor, Department of Breast Medical Oncology
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, Texas
Chair, BCRF Scientific Advisory Board

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Gabriel N. Hortobagyi, MD, FACP, FASCO

Professor, Department of Breast Medical Oncology
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, Texas
Chair, BCRF Scientific Advisory Board

GABRIEL N. HORTOBAGYI, MD, FACP, FASCO and MIEN-CHIE HUNG, PhD have found that the antidiabetes drug metformin can be given to patients to enhance the effectiveness of immunotherapy. They have also identified an enzyme that may serve as a biomarker to predict resistance to a specific type of immunotherapy (anti PD-1 and anti PD-L1 immune checkpoint therapy).

Drs. Hortobagyi and Hung are conducting research to improve outcomes in patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) by enhancing response to existing therapies and developing new ones. TNBC is an aggressive form of breast cancer that is challenging to treat and is more likely to spread and recur. Immunotherapies have shown some benefit in patients with TNBC, but most receive very little benefit and may suffer severe side effects. Drs. Hortobagyi and Hung are investigating the causes of resistance to PD-L1/PD-1 immune checkpoint therapy, which will allow them to develop effective combination therapies to overcome resistance.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies' Employee Fundraising Award

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Mien-Chie Hung, PhD

President, China Medical University
Taichung, Taiwan, China

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Mien-Chie Hung, PhD

President, China Medical University
Taichung, Taiwan, China

MIEN-CHIE HUNG, PhD and GABRIEL N. HORTOBAGYI, MD, FACP, FASCO have found that the antidiabetes drug metformin can be given to patients to enhance the effectiveness of immunotherapy. They have also identified an enzyme that may serve as a biomarker to predict resistance to a specific type of immunotherapy (anti PD-1 and anti PD-L1 immune checkpoint therapy).

Drs. Hung and Hortobagyi are conducting research to improve outcomes in patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) by enhancing response to existing therapies and developing new ones. TNBC is an aggressive form of breast cancer that is challenging to treat and is more likely to spread and recur. Immunotherapies have shown some benefit in patients with TNBC, but most receive very little benefit and may suffer severe side effects. Drs. Hung and Hortobagyi are investigating the causes of resistance to PD-L1/PD-1 immune checkpoint therapy, which will allow them to develop effective combination therapies to overcome resistance.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies' Employee Fundraising Award

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Addressing Disparities

Funmi Olopade

Funmi I. Olopade, MB, BS, FACP

Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics
University of Chicago

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Funmi I. Olopade, MB, BS, FACP

Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics
University of Chicago

Women of African descent are more likely to be diagnosed with aggressive breast cancers than white women and more likely to die from their disease. Additionally, women in remote or low-resource areas have limited access to screening or genetic testing, compounding the challenge of reducing breast cancer deaths in women of African descent. FUNMI I. OLOPADE, MB, BS, FACP, Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics, University of Chicago, has created an international program in Sub-Sahara Africa to study the causes of breast cancer and to create an infrastructure to ensure that high-risk women get quality preventive screening and treatment. She and her University of Chicago colleagues have made tremendous progress in closing this knowledge gap through ther Nigeria Breast Cancer Study (NBCS), which aims to improve the quality of breast cancer care in underserved low-resource communities through rigorous science and technology. These efforts are creating a strong clinical research infrastructure, which can be used to further strengthen the country’s capacity to address and respond to emerging cancer care needs.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ North America Manufacturing & Distribution and Global Research & Development Awards

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Lawrence Shulman, MD

Deputy Director, Clinical Services
University of Pennsylvania

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Lawrence Shulman, MD

Deputy Director, Clinical Services
University of Pennsylvania

Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide, with low-income and low-resource communities bearing a significant burden of deaths. Lack of screening and follow-up increase the chance that a woman will be diagnosed with advanced breast cancer and may not get quality treatment. LAWRENCE SHULMAN, MD, Deputy Director of Clinical Services at the University of Pennsylvania and BCRF co-investigator, SHYIRAMBERE CYPRIEN, Director of Oncology Partners in Health, Butaro Hospital are changing this statistic in rural area hospitals in Rwanda with emphasis on training and infrastructure to increase early detection and reduce time to treatment. With early successes reported, they are expanding these efforts to more sites.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ North America Manufacturing & Distribution and Global Research & Development Awards

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Shyirambere Cyprien

Director of Oncology, Partners in Health/Inshuti Mu Buzima
Administrative Director, Oncology Program
Butaro Cancer Center of Excellence
Rwanda

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Shyirambere Cyprien

Director of Oncology, Partners in Health/Inshuti Mu Buzima
Administrative Director, Oncology Program
Butaro Cancer Center of Excellence
Rwanda

Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide, with low-income and low-resource communities bearing a significant burden of deaths. Lack of screening and follow-up increase the chance that a woman will be diagnosed with advanced breast cancer and may not get quality treatment. LAWRENCE SHULMAN, MD, Deputy Director of Clinical Services at the University of Pennsylvania and BCRF co-investigator, SHYRAMBERE CYPRIEN, Director of Oncology Partners in Health, Butaro Hospital are changing this statistic in rural area hospitals in Rwanda with emphasis on training and infrastructure to increase early detection and reduce time to treatment. With early successes reported, they are expanding these efforts to more sites.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ North America Manufacturing & Distribution and Global Research & Development Awards

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Mariana Chavez MacGregor

MARIANA CHAVEZ-MACGREGOR MD, MSc

Associate Professor, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

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MARIANA CHAVEZ-MACGREGOR MD, MSc

Associate Professor, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Among patients with early-stage breast cancer, the use of adjuvant chemotherapy significantly decreases the risk of recurrence and improves overall survival. However, patients who experience delays in the initiation of chemotherapy may not have the same improved survival. Delays are more likely to occur in patients with more comorbidities, those of Hispanic or African American race/ethnicity, patients without a partner, Medicare or Medicaid beneficiaries, and those belonging to a low socioeconomic status. MARIANA CHAVEZ-MACGREGOR, MD, MSc, Associate Professor, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, in Houston, is conducting an intervention study to reduce the time to treatment in a vulnerable population of breast cancer patients.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Employee Fundraising Award

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JORGE GOMEZ, MD, PhD

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JORGE GOMEZ, MD, PhD

Assistant Vice President for Translational Research in Special Populations; Associate Director, Center for Elimination of Border Health Disparities, University of Arizona Health Sciences; Assistant Director for Cancer Research, University of Arizona Cancer Center; Assistant Professor, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson.

Dr. Gomez has identified cultural, language, and financial barriers to breast cancer screening and preventive care faced by Latinas in the southwest region of the U.S. His findings have guided the development of a culturally appropriate program that could ultimately improve breast cancer outcomes in this underserved population. JORGE GOMEZ, MD, PhD wants to improve access to breast cancer screening among Hispanic women in under resourced settings in the region.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies› Employee Fundraising Award

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Prevention

Regina Santella

Regina M. Santella, PhD

Professor, Columbia University
Mailman School of Public Health

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Regina M. Santella, PhD

Professor, Columbia University
Mailman School of Public Health

Breast cancers that occur frequently in families can be due to both genetic and environmental factors. A person’s genetic background can affect how his/her body responds to a range of environmental influences; from diet to common chemicals. REGINA M. SANTELLA, PhD and MARY BETH TERRY, PhD, Professors at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, are conducting studies to understand the impact of environmental exposures in young girls from high-risk families to develop better risk prediction models and preventive strategies.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Aveda Award

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Mary Beth Terry

Mary Beth Terry, PhD

Professor, Columbia University,
Mailman School of Public Health

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Mary Beth Terry, PhD

Professor, Columbia University,
Mailman School of Public Health

Breast cancers that occur frequently in families can be due to both genetic and environmental factors. A person’s genetic background can affect how his/her body responds to a range of environmental influences; from diet to common chemicals. REGINA M. SANTELLA, PhD and MARY BETH TERRY, PhD, Professors at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, are conducting studies to understand the impact of environmental exposures in young girls from high-risk families to develop better risk prediction models and preventive strategies.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Aveda Award

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Vered Stearns

Vered Stearns, MD

Professor of Oncology
Director, Women's Malignancies Disease Group
Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center
Johns Hopkins University
Member, BCRF Scientific Advisory Board

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Vered Stearns, MD

Professor of Oncology
Director, Women's Malignancies Disease Group
Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center
Johns Hopkins University
Member, BCRF Scientific Advisory Board

Lifestyle factors can affect breast cancer risk. Being overweight or obese increases the risk of breast cancer after menopause and may result in worse outcome for women diagnosed with breast cancer at any age. VERED STEARNS, MD, Co-Director of the Breast Cancer Program at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University, is conducting studies to develop effective weight loss interventions and provide new clues to how weight loss may reduce the risk of breast cancer.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Awards

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Thomas Kensler

Thomas Kensler, PhD

Full Member, Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

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Thomas Kensler, PhD

Full Member, Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Puberty and adolescence are times of rapid breast development. Studies have shown that external factors, such as diet and other lifestyle choices during adolescence, can increase the risk of breast cancer later in life. THOMAS KENSLER, PHD Full Member, Public Health Sciences Division Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center is conducting studies to understand how an unhealthy diet, one high in sugar, refined and processed food, may cause an increase in breast cancer risk.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Aveda Awards

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Metastasis

Monicia Fornier

Monica Fornier, MD

Associate Member at the Breast Medicine Service
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Assistant Professor
Weill Cornell Medical College

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Monica Fornier, MD

Associate Member at the Breast Medicine Service
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Assistant Professor
Weill Cornell Medical College

Approximately 25 percent of patients with early stage breast cancer will be diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer. Breast cancer recurrence is a serious clinical challenge and a source of anxiety that many patients experience after treatment ends. MONICA FORNIER, MD, a medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and an Assistant Professor at Weill Cornell Medical College and her international colleague, LAURA BIGANZOLI, MD of the Hospital Prato, Instituto Tuscano Tumori Italy, are conducting studies to understand how metabolites in the blood may be used to identify women with a high risk of breast cancer recurrence.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ North America Manufacturing & Distribution and Global Research & Development Awards

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Laura Biganzoli

Laura Biganzoli, MD

Breast Unit Coordinator
Hospital Prato, Instituto Tuscano Prato, Italy

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Laura Biganzoli, MD

Breast Unit Coordinator
Hospital Prato, Instituto Tuscano Prato, Italy

Approximately 25 percent of patients with early stage breast cancer will be diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer. Breast cancer recurrence is a serious clinical challenge and a source of anxiety that many patients experience after treatment ends. MONICA FORNIER, MD, a medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and an Assistant Professor at Weill Cornell Medical College and her international colleague, LAURA BIGANZOLI, MD of the Hospital Prato, Instituto Tuscano Tumori Italy, are conducting studies to understand how metabolites in the blood may be used to identify women with a high risk of breast cancer recurrence.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ North America Manufacturing & Distribution and Global Research & Development Awards

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Survivorship

These studies focus on issues that patients face after breast cancer diagnosis and during treatment.

Patricia Ganz

Patricia A. Ganz, MD

BCRF Scientific Advisor
Director, Cancer & Control Research, UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Patricia A. Ganz, MD

BCRF Scientific Advisor
Director, Cancer & Control Research, UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center

Patients are living longer after breast cancer, because of more effective therapies. These lifesaving therapies, however, can have long-term side effects that diminish quality of life after therapy ends, including loss of brain function, a condition sometimes called “chemobrain.” PATRICIA A. GANZ, MD, a BCRF Scientific Advisor and the Director of Cancer Prevention & Control Research at UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, is conducting a series of studies aimed at understanding how cancer therapies affect cognitive function and other factors related to quality of life. Dr. Ganz and her colleagues have continued to study a group of women after the end of treatment, and their reports have provided a rich source of information that has been helpful to patients and clinicians in understanding what to expect after treatment.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Awards

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Lesley Fallowfield

Dame Lesley Fallowfield, DBE, BSc, DPhil, FMedSci

Professor, Psycho-oncology at Brighton & Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, U.K.

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Dame Lesley Fallowfield, DBE, BSc, DPhil, FMedSci

Professor, Psycho-oncology at Brighton & Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, U.K.

In cases of an unusual breast cancer diagnosis, such as diagnosis at a young age, genetic testing for inherited mutations in breast cancer risk genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, for instance is commonly prescribed. Many oncologists lack the necessary training for the difficult patient conversations following genetic testing. DAME LESLEY FALLOWFIELD, DBE, BSc, DPhil, FMedSci, Professor of Psycho-oncology at Brighton & Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, U.K., is leading a multi-disciplinary effort to create a training program for oncologists and genetic counselors to improve the communication skills of the healthcare team and the experience of women who face a breast cancer diagnosis and the news of a genetic susceptibility.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brands Awards in Memory of Evelyn H. Lauder

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Julienne Bower

Julienne E. Bower, PhD

Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry/Biobehavioral Sciences
David Geffen School of Medicine
University of California, Los Angeles

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Julienne E. Bower, PhD

Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry/Biobehavioral Sciences
David Geffen School of Medicine
University of California, Los Angeles

In a unique collaboration at UCLA, Associate Professors JULIENNE E. BOWER, PhD and STEVEN W. COLE, PhD, are studying the role that stress and the immune system play in cancer. They recently showed that social isolation can increase markers of inflammation in breast cancer survivors. Over the next year, they will conduct a more rigorous test of the association of social isolation and markers of stress in breast cancer patients participating in a clinical trial. The goal of the study is to see if the effect of stress related to social isolation is more relevant for particular types of breast tumors, and ultimately, to identify new targets for intervention to improve outcomes for women with breast cancer.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brands Awards in Memory of Evelyn H. Lauder

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Steven Cole

Steven W. Cole, PhD

Professor, Division of Hematology-Oncology and Department of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences
David Geffen School of Medicine
University of California, Los Angeles

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Steven W. Cole, PhD

Professor, Division of Hematology-Oncology and Department of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences
David Geffen School of Medicine
University of California, Los Angeles

In a unique collaboration at UCLA, Associate Professors JULIENNE E. BOWER, PhD and STEVEN W. COLE, PhD, are studying the role that stress and the immune system play in cancer. They recently showed that social isolation can increase markers of inflammation in breast cancer survivors. Over the next year, they will conduct a more rigorous test of the association of social isolation and markers of stress in breast cancer patients participating in a clinical trial. The goal of the study is to see if the effect of stress related to social isolation is more relevant for particular types of breast tumors, and ultimately, to identify new targets for intervention to improve outcomes for women with breast cancer.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brands Awards in Memory of Evelyn H. Lauder

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